Checking Your Rental History

Renting Sins Committed in College Can Haunt You Later in Life

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Renting Sins Committed in College Can Haunt You Later in Life
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College students renting apartments should realize their activity could be denoted on rental history reports for up to seven years.

College students renting apartments should realize their activity could be denoted on rental history reports for up to seven years.

Brian was a sophomore in college when he and Allison met in an advanced American poetry class. The couple soon began spending virtually all of their free time together and quickly fell in love. After a few months of dating, the young couple mutually decided to move in together.

Before launching their search for an apartment, both Brian and Allison obtained a comprehensive rental history report—complete with credit score and criminal background check—from MyRentalHistoryReport.com. The data allowed each to see the foundation of their blossoming credit report and provided key guidance in which apartments to concentrate their quest.

The two English majors found an apartment building close to campus and met with a grumpy landlord. Brian and Allison signed on the dotted line and could barely contain their excitement as they began moving their furniture and other possessions into their new place.

Things went well at first, but soon the stresses of college life caused the relationship to fracture. Brian decided the best thing for both he and Allison was to move out, and he left the apartment before the one-year lease was finished. Allison left shortly after, leaving the apartment vacant and that grumpy landlord with a broken lease and a balance due.

Both Brian and Allison went on to successfully finish their degrees, find good jobs and eventually start families. That dingy college apartment was a distant memory that neither imagined would come back to haunt them. It wasn’t until five years later, when Brian and his new wife were sitting down with the manager of a Dallas apartment complex, that the past renting sin would boil to the surface.

Leaving the apartment he and Allison shared immediately resulted in a notation on Brian’s rental history report, and was grounds for disqualification from the property he and his wife were interested in renting. The last time Brian had bothered to check his rental report was prior to moving in with Allison, and he found himself blindsided by the negative entry.

Faced with an unforeseen battle to rent, Brian reached out to his old girlfriend to discuss the situation. Allison, who now lived in the northeast, had also run into difficulties renting and likewise encountered potential landlords who declined her application based on the broken lease back in college.

The two decided to contact their old landlord in an effort to rectify the situation and repair the damage.

It didn’t take much for their old landlord, who was as grumpy as ever, to recall the young couple eager to rent a unit in his building. He was insulted the two left without so much as a wave, and explained how he had little recourse other than to ding their credit reports.

Brian and Allison agreed to pay the balance owned in full—with interest—in return for a letter from the landlord explaining the two were good tenants during their time in his building and that the balance owed had been remitted.

This letter, coupled with updated rental history reports from us, was enough to convince landlords in both Dallas and the northeast to rent to Brian and Allison, respectively.